The Village of Belmont

 

Belmont is a small moorland village on the A675 close to the Greater Manchester border in the town of Bolton and stands 900ft above sea level. The original hamlet was called Horden but was renamed in 1804 – the new name meaning beautiful hill. Remains of the old name can still be found at Hordern Pasture and Stoops to the West of the village. The village was based on the industries of bleaching and dying, although stone quarrying was formerly carried out to a large extent. Much of the housing (built in local millstone grit) was built to accommodate the calico print works that closed down in the 1860’s. At its height, the population of the village trebled. The village has now reverted back to a mainly rural moorland community, although the Bleach Works are a reminder of the villages industrial past. Some of the houses off Maria Square, opposite the Black Dog are on such a steep hillside that they have two storeys at the front, but four at the back. Belmont is a small moorland village on the A675 close to the Greater Manchester border in the town of Bolton and stands 900ft above sea level. The original hamlet was called Horden but was renamed in 1804 – the new name meaning beautiful hill. Remains of the old name can still be found at Hordern Pasture and Stoops to the West of the village. The village was based on the industries of bleaching and dying, although stone quarrying was formerly carried out to a large extent. Much of the housing (built in local millstone grit) was built to accommodate the calico print works that closed down in the 1860’s. At its height, the population of the village trebled. The village has now reverted back to a mainly rural moorland community, although the Bleach Works are a reminder of the villages industrial past. Some of the houses off Maria Square, opposite the Black Dog are on such a steep hillside that they have two storeys at the front, but four at the back.

The village located three miles north west of Bolton along the A675 which was a turnpike road constructed shortly after 1800 to link Preston with Bolton, is dominated by Winter Hill, the highest point in the West Pennines & the area is popular with walkers. Many ramblers use the Black Dog as a stopping off point. The pub is one of the few that served the excellent Manchester based Joseph Holt ale. If however, you prefer sailing or canoeing, the local reservoirs have well-established clubs – Belmont Reservoir (Bolton Sailing Club) and Delph Reservoir (Delph Sailing Club). Another reservoir – The Wards Reservoir is locally known as the Blue Lagoon, is owned privately by Belmont Bleach Works. The supply of water for public consumption is taken from the Springs Reservoir and the Dingle Reservoir.
An unusual feature of the village is the street name plaques – carved stone in oval cartouches. Millworker’s cottages can be found along High Street and Maria Square.

Belmont’s most notable resident was an Edward Deakin owner of the local Bleachworks who went on to become High Sheriff of Lancashire and personal friend of Lord Leverhulme. He resided at Hilltop House overlooking the village, unfortunately, the house was destroyed by fire in the early 1900’s.
Engraved on the Belmont Reservoir Treaty Memorial is the following:

Delph Sailing Club

A family-friendly sailing club, Belmont

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