Historical Buildings in Edgworth

 

Entwistle Hall, Entwistle

Entwistle Hall, Entwistle

An earlier hall stood here, built in 1200, and from the earlier hall Sir Bertine Entwistle, the most illustrious member of the Entwistle family, set out to fight at Agincourt in 1415. The present hall was built in the early 17th century and in 1657 was divided into three. In 1826 the then owner of the hall converted the bedrooms for use as weaving sheds for the unemployed of the district. There are ‘beebols’ – recesses in which to stand beehives – in the garden wall. The house is at present divided into four. It has timber and plaster walls and the original oak beams.

New Hall, Entwistle

The date of the house is estimated at about 1680. In 1682 the house belonged to John Aspden and his wife Alice. The datestone of     1742 J B M
was built into the house when John Brandwood and his wife Mary took possession of it.

New Hall is well proportioned, the elevation symmetrical, the windows mullioned and the roof stone slated. Inside the house has the original oak staircase and oak beams.

New Hall, Entwistle

 

Vale House, Turton Bottoms

Vale House, Turton Bottoms

Although built in the late Georgian period (1792) when urban architecture was becoming more frivolous, this attractive house has the rugged simplicity of its moorland neighbours. The south-facing front in dressed local stone with large quoins, though well proportioned lacks the height and elegance of a contemporary town house. Its fanlight, however, is typical of its period.

Reputed to stand on 16th century foundations, the building housed the manager of the now demolished Vale Cotton Mill. Its charm has been much enhanced by its recent cleaning.

The stone mounting block is one of the few remaining in the district.

 

Brandwood Fold, Edgworth

The Roman road from Manchester to Ribchester may pass through the fold. It is traceable to Bottom o’th’ Knotts and then beyond Edgworth through Wayoh Fold and past Whittlestone Head.

The fold was once very populous. In 1801 it contained 19 houses and 149 people, Sir Thomas Barlow, physician to Queen Victoria and Edward VII, was born here. He was one of the Barlows of Barlow & Jones, cotton spinners.

The fold is early 18th century in date, built in stone with mullioned stone windows.

Brandwood Fold, Edgworth
Horrocks Fold, Edgworth

Horrocks Fold, Edgworth

John Horrocks, who founded the business of Horrocks, Crewdson & Co., cotton spinners, was born here, son of a small quarry owner. He started here, helped by his sisters, with a few spinning frames. He later (in 1791) moved to Preston and was M.P. for Preston in 1802.

The house is a compact 17th century yeoman’s house with a flagstone roof and is built in this coursed rubble masonry. There is an obliterated datestone or plaque on the west gable. The ground floor windows are characteristically stone mullioned with a continuous stone course, but the first floor windows, also stone mullioned, have a more interesting arrangement with raised centrelights and moulded jambs. In particular the west gable three-light window with ogee head is an unusual feature of Gothic ecclesiastical design without any apparent reason in a house of this kind.

Pack Saddle Bridge, Edgworth

This was the only bridge round here before the building of the present Turton Bottoms bridge. It was on a pack-horse route which came via the Birches, past the former St. Anne’s Primary school, Chapeltown and through Chapeltown. It must have been much used when the Lord of the Manor’s cornmill was sited a little higher upstream.

In 1691 this bridge was known as the New Mill Bridge.

Pack Saddle Bridge, Edgworth
National Children's Homes, Edgworth

National Children’s Homes,
Edgworth

In 1871 James Barlow bought the Wheatsheaf Inn with 80 acres of land around it and offered it, together with £5,000 to a young Methodist minister, Thomas Bowman Stephenson, who had been running a home for outcast and neglected children in London. Stephenson accepted the offer, and in 1872 the Edgworth Homes, later to be National Children’s Homes, started with 28 children.

The words ‘Wheatsheaf Inn’ may be seen on one of the photographs. The former inn is built in local gritstone with finer sandstone dressings, having been substantially reconstructed in the middle twenties to provide the central hall, gymnasium and administrative buildings of the orphanage.

Attached to "The Wheatsheaf" is a chapel, and separate school buildings form part of the group. With two exceptions, they are all of the same local gritstone and were constructed in the main part by the inhabitants of the school; no doubt local tradesmen assisted.

National Children's Homes, Edgworth

We would like to acknowledge the original Turton Committe of the Bolton and District Civic Trust for the records of the buildings listed on this web page.

The Standard MIDI File now playing is entitled "Sonatina in Bb" by Handel and is the copyright of Roland (UK) Ltd

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